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My Posts on Standby Database[s] -- Data Guard

Hemant K Chitale - Sun, 2021-10-17 04:10
Although I have, in previous posts, covered Data Guard in 12c (and 12cR1 RAC), this is a list of recent Blog Posts on Data Guard. 





















Categories: DBA Blogs

My Posts on Database Flashback

Hemant K Chitale - Sun, 2021-10-17 03:43

 

My Blog Posts on Database Flashback

(The first 5 demonstrations are in 11gR2.  The last demonstration is in 19c)


(not in the series)



Categories: DBA Blogs

Blue-Green Deployment in Azure

Online Apps DBA - Sun, 2021-10-17 00:48

When you are deploying a new change into production, the associated deployment should be in a predictable manner. In simple terms, this means no disruption and zero downtime! The safe strategy can be achieved by working with two identical infrastructures – the “green” environment hosting the current production and the “blue” environment with the new […]

The post Blue-Green Deployment in Azure appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

OpenShift on Azure for Beginners

Online Apps DBA - Sun, 2021-10-17 00:30

 Architecture and Features Azure Red Hat OpenShift ➪ provides fully managed and highly available OpenShift clusters on-demand that are jointly monitored and operated by Microsoft and Red Hat.  Azure Red Hat OpenShift  ➪ follows a simple architecture that depends on smaller decoupled entities called Microservices. These decoupled entities work together and run on the Kubernetes cluster. All of […]

The post OpenShift on Azure for Beginners appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Oracle Cloud Pay As You Go (PAYG) Subscription Model

Online Apps DBA - Sun, 2021-10-17 00:10

Pay As You Go (PAYG) model lets you quickly provision services with no commitment, and you’re only charged for what service you use. There is no upfront commitment and no minimum service period. Any cloud infrastructure (IaaS) and platform (PaaS) services consumed are metered and billed based on that consumption.This model Produced bills for outsourced […]

The post Oracle Cloud Pay As You Go (PAYG) Subscription Model appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

[Recap] Day 3: Manage Identity and Access in Cloud, Part- II

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 23:47

With each passing day, gigabytes of data are generated, and hackers have a banquet to choose from unless we as security specialists, intervene .One quick question before we get into the third session’s cloud security reviews! Are you going to let anyone inside your home?No, no, no!This demonstrates the importance of security and managing identity and access even in the […]

The post [Recap] Day 3: Manage Identity and Access in Cloud, Part- II appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

[Recap] Day 4: Implement Platform Protection In Cloud

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 23:36

If you work in IT, you’ve probably heard about cloud computing. If you work in the , you’ve probably heard of Cloud Security, and if you work in Cloud Security, you’ve probably heard of Platform Security. So it doesn’t matter if you work in IT or Sales, Cloud or Operations, security or deployment. If you are […]

The post [Recap] Day 4: Implement Platform Protection In Cloud appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

[Recap] Day 5: Implement Platform Protection In Cloud – Part 2

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 23:23

How often do you feel anxious when our data is on-premise? as we are concerned about its security. But, once you’ve moved your data to the cloud, you’ll live stress-free.On this note, let’s start the recap of Day 5 of our Cloud Security course, which began with Firewalland saw to build User-defined routes using Route Table. […]

The post [Recap] Day 5: Implement Platform Protection In Cloud – Part 2 appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Basic DDL Replication with Oracle GoldenGate

DBASolved - Sat, 2021-10-16 19:40

With any type of replication configuration or replication tool, primary purpose is to move the data as transactions are committed […]

The post Basic DDL Replication with Oracle GoldenGate appeared first on DBASolved.

Categories: DBA Blogs

CSM (Certified Scrum Master) Certification

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 05:43

Do you know, according to Payscale.com, Certified Scrum Master jobs will be among the top trending jobs by the year 2025?  Scrum ➪ is a process or a framework that helps generate adaptive solutions for modern world complex problems and deliver the best value product.  A Scrum Master ➪ is a highly skilled professional who is responsible for leading a team during a project with the best practices […]

The post CSM (Certified Scrum Master) Certification appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

OpenShift Industry Based Use Case

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 05:42

esDo you know more than 50% of the Fortune 100 companies have opted for RedHat OpenShift   OpenShift is an open-source, cloud-enabled Platform as a Service offering from RedHat. It helps companies and other organizations shift their traditional application infrastructure and platform from physical, virtual mediums to the cloud environment  OpenShift Offers a number of advantages such as self-service platform, […]

The post OpenShift Industry Based Use Case appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Python Functions: Overview, Types, Arguments, Doctstirng

Online Apps DBA - Sat, 2021-10-16 05:17

 Python Functions is a block of related statements designed to perform a computational, logical, or evaluative task.  The idea  is to put some commonly or repeatedly done tasks together and make a function so that instead of writing the same code multiple times for different inputs, function calls can be done to reuse the code contained […]

The post Python Functions: Overview, Types, Arguments, Doctstirng appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

use_nl redux

Jonathan Lewis - Fri, 2021-10-15 08:58

A question has just appeared on a note I wrote in 2012 about the incorrect use of the use_nl() hint in some sys-recursive SQL, linking forward to an explanation I wrote in 2017 of the use_nl() hint – particularly the interpretation of the form use_nl(a,b), which does not mean “use a nested loop from table A to table B)”.

The question is essentially turns into – “does Oracle pick the join order before it looks at the hints”?

I’m going to look at one of the queries (based on the 2017 table creation code) that was supplied in the question and explain how Oracle gets to the plan it uses in my (21.3) system; here’s the query, followed by the plan:

select
        /*+ use_nl(b) */
        a.v1, b.v1, c.v1, d.v1
from
        a, b, c, d
where
        d.n100 = 0
and     a.n100 = d.id
and     b.n100 = a.n2
and     c.id   = a.id
/


| Id  | Operation            | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT     |      | 20000 |  1347K|   105   (5)| 00:00:01 |
|*  1 |  HASH JOIN           |      | 20000 |  1347K|   105   (5)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL  | C    | 10000 |   146K|    26   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  3 |   HASH JOIN          |      | 20000 |  1054K|    78   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  4 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL | D    |   100 |  1800 |    26   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  5 |    HASH JOIN         |      | 20000 |   703K|    52   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|   6 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| B    | 10000 |   136K|    26   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|   7 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| A    | 10000 |   214K|    26   (4)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Outline Data
-------------
  /*+
      BEGIN_OUTLINE_DATA
      SWAP_JOIN_INPUTS(@"SEL$1" "C"@"SEL$1")
      SWAP_JOIN_INPUTS(@"SEL$1" "D"@"SEL$1")
      USE_HASH(@"SEL$1" "C"@"SEL$1")
      USE_HASH(@"SEL$1" "D"@"SEL$1")
      USE_HASH(@"SEL$1" "A"@"SEL$1")
      LEADING(@"SEL$1" "B"@"SEL$1" "A"@"SEL$1" "D"@"SEL$1" "C"@"SEL$1")
      FULL(@"SEL$1" "C"@"SEL$1")
      FULL(@"SEL$1" "D"@"SEL$1")
      FULL(@"SEL$1" "A"@"SEL$1")
      FULL(@"SEL$1" "B"@"SEL$1")
      OUTLINE_LEAF(@"SEL$1")
      ALL_ROWS
      DB_VERSION('21.1.0')
      OPTIMIZER_FEATURES_ENABLE('21.1.0')
      IGNORE_OPTIM_EMBEDDED_HINTS
      END_OUTLINE_DATA
  */

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   1 - access("C"."ID"="A"."ID")
   3 - access("A"."N100"="D"."ID")
   4 - filter("D"."N100"=0)
   5 - access("B"."N100"="A"."N2")

Hint Report (identified by operation id / Query Block Name / Object Alias):
Total hints for statement: 1 (U - Unused (1))
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
   6 -  SEL$1 / "B"@"SEL$1"
         U -  use_nl(b)

Note
-----
   - this is an adaptive plan

Points to note:

  • The Hint Report says the plan final did not use the use_nl(b) hint.
  • Whatever you may think the join order is by looking at the bodyy of the plan, the leading() hint in the Outline Information tells us that the join order was (B A D C) – and that explains why the use_nl(b) hint could not be used, because B was never “the next table in the join order”.
  • The “visible” order of activity displayed in the plan is C D B A, but that’s because we swap_join_inputs(D) to put it about the (B,A) join, then swap_join_inputs(C) to put that above D.

So did Oracle completely pre-empt any plans that allowed B to be “the next table”, thus avoiding the hint, or did it consider some plans where B wasn’t the first table in the join order, and if would it have used a nested loop into B if that plan had had a low enough cost?

The only way to answer these questions is to look at the CBO (10053) trace file; and for very simply queries it’s often enough to pick out a few lines as a starting point – in my case using egrep:

egrep -e "^Join order" -e"Best so far" or21_ora_15956.trc

Join order[1]:  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  B[B]#2  C[C]#3
Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
Join order[2]:  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  C[C]#3  B[B]#2
Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
Join order[3]:  D[D]#0  B[B]#2  A[A]#1  C[C]#3
Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
Join order[4]:  D[D]#0  B[B]#2  C[C]#3  A[A]#1
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[5]:  D[D]#0  C[C]#3  A[A]#1  B[B]#2
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[6]:  D[D]#0  C[C]#3  B[B]#2  A[A]#1
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost

Join order[7]:  A[A]#1  D[D]#0  B[B]#2  C[C]#3
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[8]:  A[A]#1  D[D]#0  C[C]#3  B[B]#2
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[9]:  A[A]#1  B[B]#2  D[D]#0  C[C]#3
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[10]:  A[A]#1  C[C]#3  D[D]#0  B[B]#2
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[11]:  A[A]#1  C[C]#3  B[B]#2  D[D]#0
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost

Join order[12]:  B[B]#2  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  C[C]#3
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[13]:  B[B]#2  A[A]#1  D[D]#0  C[C]#3
Best so far:  Table#: 2  cost: 25.692039  card: 10000.000000  bytes: 140000.000000
Join order[14]:  B[B]#2  A[A]#1  C[C]#3  D[D]#0
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[15]:  B[B]#2  C[C]#3  D[D]#0  A[A]#1
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost

Join order[16]:  C[C]#3  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  B[B]#2
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[17]:  C[C]#3  A[A]#1  D[D]#0  B[B]#2
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[18]:  C[C]#3  A[A]#1  B[B]#2  D[D]#0
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost
Join order[19]:  C[C]#3  B[B]#2  D[D]#0  A[A]#1
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost

Oracle has considerd 19 possible join orders (out of a maximum of 24 (= 4!). In theory we should see 6 plans starting with wach of the 4 tables. In fact we we that the optimizer’s first choice started with table D, producing 6 join orders, then switched to starting with table A, producing only 5 join orders.

The “missing” order is (A, B, C, D) which should have appeared between join orders 9 and 10. If we check the trace file in more detail we’ll see that the optimizer aborted after calculation the join from A to B because the cost had already exceeded the “Best so far” by then so it didn’t carry on to calculate the cost going on to D. Clearly , then, there was no point in considering any other order that starting with (A, B) hence the absence of (A, B, C, D).

I’ve highlighted all the join orders where the optimizer didn’t abort. The “Best so far” line that I have reported (for ease of searching and reporting) is misleading – it’s only the cost of the first table in join order, this is what the 4 non-aborted summaries look like:

egrep -A+3 -e"Best so far" or21_ora_15956.trc

Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
              Table#: 1  cost: 51.767478  card: 10000.000000  bytes: 400000.000000
              Table#: 2  cost: 30137.036118  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1080000.000000
              Table#: 3  cost: 30163.548157  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1380000.000000
--
Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
              Table#: 1  cost: 51.767478  card: 10000.000000  bytes: 400000.000000
              Table#: 3  cost: 78.079517  card: 10000.000000  bytes: 550000.000000
              Table#: 2  cost: 30163.348157  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1380000.000000
--
Best so far:  Table#: 0  cost: 25.752439  card: 100.000000  bytes: 1800.000000
              Table#: 2  cost: 2483.956340  card: 1000000.000000  bytes: 32000000.000000
              Table#: 1  cost: 2530.068379  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1080000.000000
              Table#: 3  cost: 2556.580418  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1380000.000000
--
Best so far:  Table#: 2  cost: 25.692039  card: 10000.000000  bytes: 140000.000000
              Table#: 1  cost: 52.204078  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 720000.000000
              Table#: 0  cost: 78.479517  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1080000.000000
              Table#: 3  cost: 104.991556  card: 20000.000000  bytes: 1380000.000000

As you can see, when we start with (B A) the estimated cost drops dramatically.

Now that we’ve see that Oracle looks at many (though not a completely exhaustive set of) plans on the way to the one it picks the thing we need to do (in theory) is check that for every single calculation where B is “the next table”, Oracle obeys our hint. Each time the optimizer join “the next” table it usually considers the cost of a Nested Loop, a Sort Merge, and a Hash Join in that order; if the optimizer is obeying the hint it will only consider the nested loop join. Here’s a suitable call to egrep with the first four join orders::

egrep -e "^Join order" -e "^Now joining" -e"^NL Join" -e"^SM Join" -e"^HA Join" or21_ora_15956.trc

Join order[1]:  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  B[B]#2  C[C]#3
Now joining: A[A]#1
NL Join
SM Join
SM Join (with index on outer)
HA Join
Now joining: B[B]#2
NL Join
Now joining: C[C]#3
NL Join
SM Join
HA Join

Join order[2]:  D[D]#0  A[A]#1  C[C]#3  B[B]#2
Now joining: C[C]#3
NL Join
SM Join
HA Join
Now joining: B[B]#2
NL Join

Join order[3]:  D[D]#0  B[B]#2  A[A]#1  C[C]#3
Now joining: B[B]#2
NL Join
Now joining: A[A]#1
NL Join
SM Join
HA Join
Now joining: C[C]#3
NL Join
SM Join
HA Join

Join order[4]:  D[D]#0  B[B]#2  C[C]#3  A[A]#1
Now joining: C[C]#3
NL Join
Join order aborted2: cost > best plan cost


As you can see, the only join considered when “Now joining” B is a nested loop join; for all other tables the three possible joins (and sometimes two variants of the Sort Merge join) are evaluated.

You may also notice another of the clever strategies the optimizer uses to minimise its workload. On the second join order the optimizer goes straight to “Now joining C” because it has remembered the result of joining A from the previous join order.

This is only a very simple example and analysis, but I hope it’s given you some idea of how the optimizer works, and how clever it tries to be about minimising the work; and how it can obey a hint while still producing an execution plan that appears to have ignored the hint.

Exploring Mapbox integration in OAC 6.2

Rittman Mead Consulting - Fri, 2021-10-15 04:36
Exploring Mapbox integration in OAC 6.2

Live location has increasingly proved important in tracking locations of objects and people in real time, especially during the pandemic when following the spread of Covid-19 became crucial in decision-making of protection protocols. Mapbox has risen in aiding numerous businesses with its high-performance platform, delivering real time mapping by collecting and processing live anonymous sensor data from users globally. OAC 6.2 was released with some Mapbox integrated features, meaning it was time to test them.

One of Mapbox’s many use cases, Vaccines.gov, devised a web application using Mapbox GL JS informing Americans of their nearest Covid-19 vaccination centres. Whilst experimenting with Mapbox in OAC, I also happened to use a Covid-19 dataset to plot some vaccinations statistics across the world. I was intrigued to see whether OAC could enable me to execute similar animations to the web application. So, I followed a video Oracle uploaded on their YouTube channel to get a gist of the features to test.

The process
This sample dataset I found on Kaggle is updated daily from the ‘Our World in Data’ GitHub repository and merged with a locations data file to distinguish the sources of these vaccinations. I imported them into DV and carried out a quick clean on a few variables I was intended to plot on a simple map visual; I replaced all null values with 0 for total_vaccinations and daily_vaccinations. I noticed the country variable was understandably being treated as an attribute, and the cleaned variables as numbers, which would help visualise the distributions easily with colour gradient scales.

First, I plotted a map using country under the Location category, and total_vaccinations under Colour.

Exploring Mapbox integration in OAC 6.2Map visualisation created using Mapbox library depicting the distribution of total vaccinations across the globe - the darker the area the higher the count.

The data is presented clearly on the map, and I could zoom in and out of specific locations seamlessly with a simple hover-and-zoom. Following the video, I added another visual depicting a table enlisting the countries and vaccines registered by each.

By selecting each field in this table, you can see the relevant country is highlighted. The first feature is the ‘Zoom to Selected’ option which directly zooms into the country of interest and can be found in the top-right menu of the map visual. Since country is only an attribute without geospatial coordinates, using the Layer Type ‘Point’ just centred the point within the country space, so leaving it as a ‘Polygon’ did not make a difference.

Exploring Mapbox integration in OAC 6.2Using fields of a table as a filter to highlight regions on the map. Zoom to Selected can be used to zoom into selected regions.

Now for the more interesting feature, enabling the ‘Use As Filter’ on the top-left icon of the table allows for automatic zooming into the map as different fields are selected. However, you need to ensure the ‘Auto Focus on Data’ feature under ‘Map’ properties is toggled on in order to see the automatic zoom functioning well; else, the map will remain static where you left off whilst other regions will be highlighted but not shown. In addition, I experimented with some map coordinates from Kaggle that looked at statistics regarding rainfall-triggered landslides across America. I realised the latitude/longitude coordinates had to be treated as an attribute (like country above) in order to accurately plot them.

Exploring Mapbox integration in OAC 6.2The whole table visualisation being used as a filter to highlight areas of interest on the map. With Auto-focus turned on, the map will automatically zoom into the selected area.

Limitations
You can also add other map backgrounds to the options listed, including OracleStreetMap, Oracle BI, Oracle Maps. From Google Maps, Baidu Maps, Web Map Service, and Tiled Web Map users can only utilise the MapView library with the first two options due to legalities.

Also worth mentioning, working with Mapbox library in OAC on an older laptop and an older version of a browser may slow down loading times of visualisations in the canvas due to some fairly intensive JavaScript.

Conclusions
Overall, the Mapbox integration in OAC can execute impressive animations around accurate geospatial data, similar to many of its business use cases today. The zoom feature is seamless and helps locate areas of interest quickly to extract relevant information. There are also various map theme options to suit visualisation needs for the data you are working with.

Categories: BI & Warehousing

Help to understand this recursive query

Tom Kyte - Thu, 2021-10-14 22:06
Hi Tom, I am not able to fully understand below recursive query. Especially, the condition "WHERE POS > 0" and " WHERE POS = 0". my understanding is pos is result of REGEXP_INSTR (STR, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}',1, RN). 1. if the first POS > 0, how could the final condition has pos = 0. 2. what's difference between pos > o and regexp_instr(str, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}', 1, rn)>0. regexp_instr(str, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}', 1, rn)>0 doesn't give expected result. thanks in advance. <code>WITH T AS (SELECT '///2E/A12345/E53421$$@#/A123456*#/A123456**4E53421$$$$$@@!!!' STR FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC67890' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC67890XYZ345679' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC67890XYZ345679UVW384453' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC67890XYZ345679UVW384453' || 'ABC67890XYZ345679' FROM DUAL UNION ALL SELECT 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' || 'ABC67890' FROM DUAL), TMP (RN, POS, STR, STR0) AS (SELECT 1, 1, STR, STR FROM T UNION ALL SELECT RN + 1, REGEXP_INSTR (STR, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}', 1, RN), REGEXP_REPLACE (STR, SUBSTR (STR, REGEXP_INSTR (STR, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}', 1, RN), 6), '', REGEXP_INSTR (STR, '[A-Z][0-9]{5}', 1, RN) + 6), STR0 FROM TMP WHERE POS > 0) SELECT * FROM TMP WHERE POS = 0</code>
Categories: DBA Blogs

begin_time/end_time in DBA_HIST_SNAPSHOT vs DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY vs AWR report

Tom Kyte - Wed, 2021-10-13 09:26
Hello Connor & Chris :-), I have some confusion about the <b>begin_time/end_time</b> in <b>DBA_HIST_SNAPSHOT</b> vs <b>DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY</b> vs <b>AWR report</b>. <code> 13:52:22 SYS@emcdb> desc dba_hist_snapshot Name Null? Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- SNAP_ID NOT NULL NUMBER DBID NOT NULL NUMBER INSTANCE_NUMBER NOT NULL NUMBER STARTUP_TIME NOT NULL TIMESTAMP(3) <b>BEGIN_INTERVAL_TIME NOT NULL TIMESTAMP(3) END_INTERVAL_TIME NOT NULL TIMESTAMP(3)</b> FLUSH_ELAPSED INTERVAL DAY(5) TO SECOND(1) SNAP_LEVEL NUMBER ERROR_COUNT NUMBER SNAP_FLAG NUMBER SNAP_TIMEZONE INTERVAL DAY(0) TO SECOND(0) BEGIN_INTERVAL_TIME_TZ TIMESTAMP(3) WITH TIME ZONE END_INTERVAL_TIME_TZ TIMESTAMP(3) WITH TIME ZONE CON_ID NUMBER </code> <code> 13:54:21 SYS@emcdb> desc dba_hist_sysmetric_summary Name Null? Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- SNAP_ID NOT NULL NUMBER DBID NOT NULL NUMBER INSTANCE_NUMBER NOT NULL NUMBER <b>BEGIN_TIME NOT NULL DATE END_TIME NOT NULL DATE</b> INTSIZE NOT NULL NUMBER GROUP_ID NOT NULL NUMBER METRIC_ID NOT NULL NUMBER METRIC_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(64) METRIC_UNIT NOT NULL VARCHAR2(64) NUM_INTERVAL NOT NULL NUMBER MINVAL NOT NULL NUMBER MAXVAL NOT NULL NUMBER AVERAGE NOT NULL NUMBER STANDARD_DEVIATION NOT NULL NUMBER SUM_SQUARES NUMBER CON_DBID NUMBER CON_ID NUMBER </code> I understand that there have begin/end snap time in an AWR report, is it like this, begin_snap_time (AWR) = begin_interval_time (DBA_HIST_SNAPSHOT) and end_snap_time (AWR) = begin_interval_time (DBA_HIST_SNAPSHOT)? or begin_snap_time (AWR) = begin_time (DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY) and end_snap_time (AWR) = end_time (DBA_HIST_SYSMETRIC_SUMMARY)? You know, since a snap_id has a begin/end_interval_time but an AWR report usually captures between two snap_id, so now I'm not sure where is the begin/end snap time in an AWR report? Best Regards Quanwen Zhao
Categories: DBA Blogs

Joel Kalllman Day

Pete Finnigan - Wed, 2021-10-13 08:06
I saw a few tweets yesterday about Joel Kallman and liked a few and shared one (maybe two) and then I saw Tim Halls post that talked about Joel Kallman day. I decided to do a quick blog now to....[Read More]

Posted by Pete On 13/10/21 At 12:02 PM

Categories: Security Blogs

Introduction To Data Types In Python: Beginners Guide

Online Apps DBA - Wed, 2021-10-13 07:26

A data type or simply a type is a property of data, that tells the language processor (compiler, interpreter) how we are going to use this data. It represents the kind of value that tells what operations can be performed on a particular data. Since everything is an object in Python programming, data types are […]

The post Introduction To Data Types In Python: Beginners Guide appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

Beginners Guide to Loops And Control Statements In Python

Online Apps DBA - Wed, 2021-10-13 05:23

 The first statement in a function is executed first, followed by the second, and so on. There may be a situation when you need to execute a block of code several times… Python has primarily 3 Loop types which are: For Loop  While Loop  Nested Loop Key Note : You can put any type of loop inside […]

The post Beginners Guide to Loops And Control Statements In Python appeared first on Oracle Trainings for Apps & Fusion DBA.

Categories: APPS Blogs

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